Middle East

 
 
Afghanistan
 

Afghanistan

     
Persian
 

Persian / Iran

 
   

Afghan food is tasteful fusion of the regions that neighbor Afghanistan. Major ethnic groups are Pashtuns, Tajiks and Uzbeks. Modern Afghan cuisine is the blending of the cooking methods of the cooking methods of the three. Influence of India is obvious in the use of spices like saffron, coriander, cardamom and black pepper. Afghan cuisine is neither too spicy nor hot."Read More"

       

Itanian cuisine Includes a wide variety of foods ranging from chelow kabab (rice served with roasted meat), khoresht (stew that is served with white basmati or Iranian rice), āsh (a thick soup), kuku (vegetable souffle), polo (white rice alone or with addition of meat and/or vegetables and herbs), and a diverse variety of salads, pastries, and drinks specific to different parts of Iran. Fresh green herbs are frequently used along with fruits such as plums, pomegranates, quince, prunes, apricots, and raisins. Typical Persian main dishes are combination of rice with meat, lamb, chicken, or fish and some onion, vegetables, nuts, and herbs."Read More"

 
                     
 
Egyptian
 

Egyptian

     
Turkish
 

Turkish

 
   

A lot of Egyptian food is, fundamentally, Turkish, the staples that you’ll find all over what was once the Ottoman Empire, from the Middle East to the Balkans. The classic Eastern Mediterranean mezze (maza in Egypt) are also thoroughly familiar. Turkish favourites include grills: the flavourful meatballs known as kofta, the pressed-meat doner kebab (shawarma in Egypt) and the chopped-meat shish kebab. Typically these are accompanied with the classic Middle Eastern simple salad of tomatoes, cucumbers, perhaps some onion, and parsley, chopped fine and, in Egypt, most often dressed with tahina (tahini), a sesame paste. More generically Middle Eastern are the maza (mezze), including hummus, the chickpea dip, baba ghanoug, a mix of smokey cooked aubergine and tahina, and ful. There’s felafel, known here as ta’amiyya, and a million and one variations on roasted chicken, classically served as a full meal preluded by soup and accompanied by rice and salad. "Read More"

       

Turkish cuisine is not homogeneous. Aside from common Turkish specialities, there are also many region-specific specialities. The Black Sea region's cuisine (northern Turkey) is based on corn and anchovies. The southeast—Urfa, Gaziantep and Adana—is famous for its kebabs, mezes and dough-based desserts such as baklava, kadayıf and künefe. Especially in the western parts of Turkey, where olive trees are grown abundantly, olive oil is the major type of oil used for cooking. The cuisines of the Aegean, Marmara and Mediterranean regions display basic characteristics of Mediterranean cuisine as they are rich in vegetables, herbs, and fish. Central Anatolia is famous for its pastry specialities such as keşkek (kashkak), mantı (especially of Kayseri) and gözleme."Read More"

 
                     
 
Lebanon
 

Lebanese

             
   

Lebanese cuisine includes an abundance of starches, whole grain, fruits, vegetables, fresh fish and seafood; animal fats are consumed sparingly. Poultry is eaten more often than red meat. When red meat is eaten it is usually lamb on the coast, and goat meat in the mountain regions. It also includes copious amounts of garlic and olive oil, often seasoned by lemon juice. olive oil, herbs, garlic and lemon are typical flavours found in the Lebanese diet.

Most often foods are either grilled, baked or sautéed in olive oil; butter or cream is rarely used other than in a few desserts. Vegetables are often eaten raw or pickled as well as cooked. Herbs and spices are used and the freshness of ingredients is important. Like most Mediterranean countries, much of what the Lebanese eat is dictated by the seasons."Read More"