Central Europe

 
 
Austrian
 

Austrian

     
Hungarian
 

Hungarian

 
   

Austria's melting pot of pan-european cooking came either by accident or as a coincidence or war. The Turkish invasion of Europe for example heralded the birth of Austria's coffee culture by introducing the coffee bean to Viennese cooks. Furthermore, "Apfelstrudel" is an Austrian version of a Turkish delicacy introduced during the Turkish occupation. The Wiener Schnitzel probably originated in northern Italy, while the delicious Palatschinken (crêpes) and the Gulasch came from the Hungarian plains; the roasts and sausages were originally Southern German delicacies, the pastries originated in Bohemia. "Read More"

       

Hungarian or Magyar cuisine is the cuisine characteristic of the nation of Hungary and its primary ethnic group, the Magyars. Traditional Hungarian dishes are primarily based on meats, seasonal vegetables, fruits, fresh bread, cheeses and honey. Hungarians are especially passionate about their soups, desserts and pastries and stuffed pancakes (palacsinta). Hungarian food is often spicy, due to the common use of hot paprika. Sweet (mild) paprika is also common. Additionally, the combination of paprika, lard and yellow onions is typical of Hungarian cuisine, and the use of the thick sour cream called tejföl."Read More"

 
                     
 
Czech
 

Czech

     
Polish
 

Polish

 
   

Traditional Czech food is not exactly what one would call dietary, however it perfectly goes with the flavourful Czech beer.

It mostly consists of pork or beef meat with sauce and a side dish, the most common and liked being dumplings. Dumplings (“knedliky”) are the Czech traditional side dish made from wheat or potato flour, boiled in water as a roll and then sliced and served hot. Chicken, duck, turkey, fish, rabbit and lamb are also used in some very tasteful Czech dishes. A good choice can be the Guláš (read like in English, “goulash“), even though it basically belongs to traditional Hungarian cuisine."Read More"

       

Cereal grains are among the country's most important dietary staples. These include wheat, rye, buckwheat, and barley.They find their way into dark bread, noodles, dumplings, and other everyday foods. Other important products include potatoes, beets, cabbage, carrots, mushrooms, and cucumbers. Boiled potatoes are the most commonly eaten side dish with meat, poultry, or fish. Pork is the most popular meat, and the most commonly eaten meat dish is a fried, breaded pork cutlet served with thick sauce. Beef, ham, and sausage are also eaten regularly."Read More"