The Caribbean

 
 
Antigen
 

Antiguan

     
Grenadian
 

Grenadian

 
   

A combination of African traditions adapted to the ingredients of the region. Favourite dishes include duccana and saltfish, which is a mixture of grated sweet potato, coconut and cornmeal flavoured with spices and steamed in banana leaf. It is served with a saltfish stew which has a tomato and onion base."Read More";

       

Special dishes reflect the cultural diversity of Grenada. The national dish, Oil Down (pronounced ile dung), is a combination of breadfruit, coconut milk, turmeric (misnamed saffron), dumplings, callaloo (taro leaves), and salted meat such as saltfish accra (codfish), smoked herring or salt beef. It"'"s often cooked in a large pot commonly referred to by locals as a karhee, or curry pot."Read More";

 
                     
 
BVI
 

British Virgin Islands

     
Haitian
 

Haitian

 
   

Traditional food tends to be spicy and hearty. Fungi (pronounced fun-gee) is a main staple of the traditional Virgin Islands diet. It consists of cornmeal that has been boiled and cooked to a thick consistency along with okra. Fungi is usually eaten with boiled fish or saltfish. Callaloo (sometimes spelled kallaloo) is a soup made from callaloo bush/leaf, often substituted with spinach. It consists of various meats and okra, and is boiled to a thick stew consistency."Read More";

       

Haitians use vegetables and meats extensively and peppers and similar herbs are often used for strengthening flavor. Dishes tend to be seasoned liberally and consequently. Haitian cuisine tends to be moderately spicy, not mild and not too hot. The flavor base of much Haitian cooking is epis, a combination sauce made from cooked peppers, garlic, and herbs, particularly green onions, thyme, and parsley. It is used as a basic condiment for rice and beans and is also used in stews and soups."Read More";

 
                     
 
Cayman
 

Cayman Islands

     
Jamaican
 

Jamaican

 
   

Cayman Islands food includes traditional Caribbean fare such as cassava, johnny cake, bread fruit, plantain, and meat pie. Jamaican cuisine has also found its way onto the menus of the Cayman Islands, and jerk seasoning has become popular for use on meat dishes such chicken, fish and pork. Curry is also used frequently in rice, chicken, and fish dishes. Traditional Caymanian fare includes dishes made from turtle meat, conch, goat, and fish such as grouper and snapper."Read More";

       

Jamaican cuisine dishes are variations on the cuisines and cooking styles brought to the island from elsewhere. These are often modified to incorporate local produce. Popular Jamaican dishes include curry goat, fried dumplings, ackee and salt fish (cod) (which is the national dish of Jamaica), fried plantain, "jerk", steamed cabbage and "rice and peas" (pigeon peas or kidney beans). Jamaican Cuisine has been adapted by African, Indian, British, French, Spanish, Chinese influences. Jamaican patties and various pastries and breads are also popular as well as fruit beverages and Jamaican rum."Read More";

 
                     
 
Cuban
 

Cuban

     
Puerto Rican
 

Puerto Rican

 
   

Cuban cuisine has been influenced by Spanish, French, African, Arabic, Chinese, and Portuguese cultures. Tthe food is sauteed or slow-cooked over a low flame. Very little is deep-fried and there are no heavy or creamy sauces. Most Cuban cooking relies on a few basic spices, such as garlic, cumin, oregano, and bay laurel leaves. Many dishes use a sofrito as their basis. The sofrito consists of onion, green pepper, garlic, oregano, and ground pepper quick-fried in olive oil. "Read More";

       

Although Puerto Rican cooking is somewhat similar to both Spanish, Cuban and Mexican cuisine, it is a unique tasty blend of Spanish, African, Taíno, and American influences, using such indigenous seasonings and ingredients as coriander, papaya, cacao, nispero, apio, plantains, and yampee. Locals call their cuisine "cocina criolla". "Read More";

 
                     
 
Dominican
 

Dominican

     
Trinidadian
 

Trinidadian

 
   

The Dominican Republic was formerly a Spanish colony. Many traditional Spanish dishes have found a new home in the Dominican Republic, some with a twist. African and Taíno dishes still hold strong, some of them unchanged.

All or nearly all food groups are accommodated in typical Dominican cuisine, as it incorporates meat or seafood; grains, especially rice, corn (native to the island), and wheat; vegetables, such as beans and other legumes, potatoes, yuca, or plantains, and salad; dairy products, especially milk and cheese; and fruits, such as oranges, bananas, and mangos. However, there is heaviest consumption of starches and meats, and least of dairy products and non-starchy vegetables."Read More";

       

Trinidad and Tobago cuisine is indicative of the blends of Indian, African, Creole,Amerindian, European, Chinese and Lebanese gastronomic influences. The national dish of Trinidad and Tobago is callaloo.

The Spanish influence can be seen (and tasted!) in many Creole dishes, including Pelau, a rice, peas and meat dish that bears some similarity to Paella - but better - at least we think so! The African slaves left their own indelible mark with the addition of root vegetables such as Yams and Dasheen to the staple diet. The East Indians brought their spices and the Chinese, well, they brought Chinese food, which can be found in practically every corner of the island.

Trinbagonian dishes are often stewed, or barbecued."Read More";