Africa

 
 
Cameroonian
 

Cameroonian

     
Nigerian
 

Nigerian

 
   

The food in Cameroon is one of the most diverse in Africa which is due to its location on the crossroads between the north, west, and centre of the continent. There is also the profound influence of French food which is a legacy of the colonial age. The Cameroonian specialties includes foods like brochettes which is a kind of barbecued kebab that is made from either chicken, beef or goat. "Read More";

       

Nigerian cuisine consists of dishes or food items from the hundreds of ethnic groups that comprise the West African nation of Nigeria. Like other West African cuisines, it uses spices, herbs in conjunction with palm oil or groundnut oil to create deeply-flavoured sauces and soups often made very hot with chili peppers."Read More";

 
                     
 
Ethiopian
 

Ethiopian

     
Senegalese
 

Senegalese

 
   

Ethiopian cuisine characteristically consists of vegetable and often very spicy meat dishes, usually in the form of wat (also w"'"et or wot), a thick stew, served atop injera, a large sourdough flatbread, which is about 20 inches in diameter and made out of fermented teff flour. Ethiopians eat exclusively with their right hands, using pieces of injera to pick up bites of entrées and side dishes. Utensils are rarely used with Ethiopian cuisine."Read More";

       

Chicken, lamb, pea, eggs, and beef are also used in Senegalese cooking, but not pork, due to the nation’s largely Muslim population. Peanuts, the primary crop, as well as couscous, white rice, sweet potatoes, lentils, black-eyed peas and various vegetables, are also incorporated into many recipes. Meats and vegetables are typically stewed or marinated in herbs and spices, and then poured over rice or couscous or simply eaten with bread."Read More";

 
                     
 
Moroccan
 

Moroccan

     
South African
 

South African

 
   

Meals usually begin with a series of hot and cold salads which are followed by a tagine, or stew. The heartiest plate, often a lamb or chicken dish, is next, followed by a heaping plate of couscous topped with meats and vegetables. A soothing cup of sweet mint tea is the grace note to this repast. It is not uncommon for Moroccans to eat
using the first three fingers of a hand, and to use bread as a "utensil." Moroccan cuisine is rich in spices."Read More";

       

For the more daring diner, South Africa offers culinary challenges ranging from crocodile sirloins to fried caterpillars to sheep heads. All three are reputed to be delicious. For the not-quite so brave, there are myriad indigenous delicacies such as biltong (dried, salted meat), bobotie (a much-improved version of Shepherd"'"s pie) and boerewors (hand-made farm sausages, grilled on an open flame)."Read More";